History Of Backpacking

Backpacking today is a lot easier and more fun then it was in the when it started. People are able to backpack with all the things they love from their homes, such as computers, phones and even watch TV on their trips. Due to all the latest technology like solar panels to charge all their equipment. Back then it was a different story. A lot of people backpacked for necessity either because of disease, starvation, wild animal attacks or robbers to name a few. It wasn’t till the 17th century people traveled for educational or entertainment purposes.

Wealthy European men were sent on a “grand tour” one last hurrah before they settled into marriage and careers. Just like the pre-college trips the teenagers in Europe take these days. Giovanni Careri was the first pioneer to travel the globe for fun. He did this travel in 80 days and wrote the accompanying book “Around the World in Eighty Days’. He was able to do this by smuggling valuables from country to country. The earliest backpackers were the ancient hunters-gatherers. Where they followed animals and ate the wild fruits. These nomadic tribes were the Aborigine Australians, South African Bushmen. Pygmy Tribes of the Congo and the Native Americans.

In 1492 Christopher Columbus ventured to America and David Livingstone explored Africa in 1841 are just two of the many explorers who paved the way for backpackers. In 1920 Lloyd F. Nelson invented the camping backpack by adding a pack board to make the pack more comfortable. Before that the backpack was just a loose sack with shoulder straps. In 1965 President Lyndon Johns proposed the National Scenic Trail Act which encouraged individuals to discover the outdoors and appreciate nature more. This provided hikers with well-defined trails to follow. Greg Lowe designed the internal fame backpack which distributes pack weight across the hips. And the backpacking gear got better from wooden frame to aluminum tubing, heavy canvas to waterproof nylon, steel cookware to titanium, wool clothing to quick dry synthetics and petroleum/wood for stoves to alcohol/butane.

In 1910 backpack is coined. In the 1940’s post World War 2 more people had time to travel so the travel trailer and camping grew in popularity. Because of the military design backpacking gear goes lighter with aluminum-alloy frames. Then the lighter frames become popular with outdoor enthusiasts. Then 1970’s lighter weight nylon backpacks are everywhere. In 1990 the program Leave No Trace Behind is developed. In 2000 all the best innovations in shelter, sleeping bags, cookware get lighter and easier to carry.

The best is yet to come as the principles of the program Leave No Trace Behind become important for our eco-conscious society and so backpacking will grow more and more. Leave nature as you found it don’t disrupt it and our beautiful wild life will continue to flourish.

How To Travel In Style And Not Spend A Fortune Along The Way

Traveling is probably one of the most popular activities for many of us. Spending money on physical goods is one thing but spending it on experiences will enrich your life. No matter if you travel within your country and exploring some hidden gems or traveling abroad, you will meet new people, try new cuisines and come back fully recharged. However, many people say that they don’t travel because it takes money to travel, especially if you are not into backpacking traveling, staying in hostels and hitch-hiking. It doesn’t have to be that way, though. You can travel in style, without paying a fortune. Here I will give you some tips.

1. Choosing a destination

If you have always wanted to visit a certain place, you should plan your holiday when there aren’t big happenings in the area and when the low season takes place. For example, if you plan to visit Rome next year, you are definitely to avoid going to Rome near June 12, as the Euro 2020 opening match between Italy and Turkey is scheduled. Also, from June 12 onwards until July you are recommended to omit the other 12 cities and countries which participate in the competition unless you are a football fan, of course.

Or, if you plan to go to some popular holiday destinations like Turkey, Greece and Spain, you are advised to book well in advance, at least… What’s more, such countries are pleasantly warm and not quite busy in the preseason, which is the first half of June or even the end of May.

2. Buying a ticket and booking an accommodation

Buying an airline ticket (or any other ticket) and booking an accommodation is usually the 2nd and 3rd step in your trip planning. For that purpose, I suggest using the aggregator Kiwi.com, where you can find cheaper tickets if you are willing to have connected flights, (compared to having the shortest routes with direct flights and buying directly from the airline.

The same applies to booking a place to stay. You can directly visit any hotel, but I suggest that you also use the aggregator services such as Trivago that enables you to get prices for different hotels at one place.

There are even dozens of startups which will rebook your airline and hotel reservation if the prices drop. These include Pruvo, Service, etc.

Besides booking a flight ticket and accommodation, you can also book tours online and save money, instead of doing it on the spot. Check out the services like GetYourGuide.com, Musement, etc.

3. Getting to the destination

Once you arrive in a new city, you probably don’t have much information on what to do unless you did your research before. That’s why it is always good to check the review sites like Tripadvisor and similar for the things to do and see, depending on your preferences.

As soon as you land at the airport, maybe you don’t even have mobile net, so can not use some ride-hailing app but even if you can even when ordering via ride-hailing app and use some well-known brand it can happen to pay more (being driven in longer routes) if they realize you are a foreigner. And probably they will realize that within 10 seconds of the ride.

Because of lack of mobile net, many tourists pick the first taxi at the taxi stand. That is probably the biggest mistake you can make, leaving bad memories of your holiday.

If you want to travel in style and pay slightly more than a regular taxi price, consider pre-arranging a meet-and-greet service with a limo service provider. Your flight can be delayed but your driver will still wait for you free of charge. In addition, you will know the exact price of your transport(ation) as well as the vehicle that will come to pick you up. Those range from the economy to premium class vehicles, including the Mercedes-Benz E-Class or S-Class, or even V-Class if you are traveling in groups. There are several good global limo service and airport transfer brands, and it is quite safe to choose the 1st or 2nd one you get in the organic Google results for limo service. This is how I chose Limos4 for my airport transfer.

Another service that you can take into account as part of your travel is a service that will help you store your luggage while you are exploring the city. For example, imagine that you came earlier to your place of stay and you cannot leave your luggage there. Instead of waiting for a few hours to get into the apartment, you can leave your luggage nearby and immediately start sightseeing. That is especially handy when leaving your hotel which is not near any tourist area and you have a flight back in the evening. Instead of leaving the luggage at the hotel lobby, come back for it and then go to the airport, you can leave your luggage in some more convenient place that will be helpful after you have finished seeing the sights. Some popular services for that are LuggageHero and Stasher.

I hope that some of these tips will help you save on your travel but not on the quality of your experiences. Enjoy traveling!

Cambridge Travel Guide for Backpackers

Whether you’re on a budget or not, if you are thinking of travelling through Cambridge, England anytime soon, you might want to read this Cambridge travel guide before you go.

I’m living in Cambridge, UK as I type this and I’ve been here for over a year now; I leave in one in half months for my first ever solo travel. This is why I thought I’d make this my first post.

What better place to start then the very beautiful city you currently live in?!

This guide is more intended for the backpacker than the holiday goer but Cambridge isn’t cheap, if you know where to look and go though, you can have a great time visiting the museums, botanical gardens, Universities and Colleges and much more!

How to get to Cambridge

Getting to Cambridge all depends on where you are coming from, and your budget.

Stansted Airport

If you are flying, Stansted Airport is the closest airport to Cambridge. There is a direct train which is very easy to find that departs for Cambridge regularly. Trains take between 30 – 40 minutes and the price ranges from £9.50 to £12.50 depending on the time of day you go. There is also a bus option which I will explain in the next section.

Bus and Coach

There are buses that run to Cambridge from Birmingham, London, Milton Keynes, Oxford and Stansted Airport. You need to decide what is the best form of transport for you, but using buses will be your cheapest option.

All of the buses arrive and depart at the coach stop on Drummer Street and Emmanuel Street which are right next to each other and are in the very centre of the city. To check all prices and times the best place to go is the National Express website, which you can find here.

Train

Cambridge has a very good train service and is easy to find. With a lot of connections to London, Stansted Airport and East Anglia, using trains is easily the quickest option if you are in a hurry There are three main Rail Lines;

Cross Country – This is a direct link between Stansted Airport and Birmingham, this is the quickest line for anyone travelling from Birmingham or Stansted or anywhere in between.

National Express East Anglia – This train runs to London Liverpool Street. They also have trains running in the Ely / Norwich direction.

First Capital Express – Trains to London Kings Cross (Can also be spelt London Kings X), also trains to Ely and Kings Lynn. To be honest, I’ve never paid much attention to the railway line I was using and I’ve used trains a lot in Cambridge! I tend to use the National Rail website to check live times and prices before I leave.

Local Transport

If you need to use a bus to get around Cambridge then Stage Coach is your best option. You can get a day pass for £3.30 which is valid all day and can be used as many times as you need on all Cambridge Stagecoach Buses. Buses run every 10 – 20 mins.

Accommodation

Staying in Cambridge can be expensive, the cheapest place I know about is the YHA, it’s a hostel and it has very good reviews. Prices are about £20 a night. If you want a hotel they can be at the very least £75 a night up to the £400 mark, yikes! This is why if you are a budget backpacker, staying at the YHA Cambridge Hostel is by far your best bet.It’s only a 5 minute walk from the train station and a 15 minute walk from the city centre.

Food and Drink

There are many places in Cambridge to get breakfast, lunch and dinner, with plenty of places to buy snacks, but it isn’t cheap, except to pay at least £5 for a good meal. Check out this website for a great guide on the cheapest places to eat in Cambridge, England.

Things To Do / See

This section could get pretty long as there are many things to do, from visiting museums, gallery’s, universities and colleges to partying in some of the clubs. I have to admit, the nightlife in Cambridge isn’t the best but most people visit Cambridge for the attractions rather than to party.

Museums

The Fitzwilliam Museum – Free

If art and antiquities is your thing then the Fitz Museum is for you.

Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences – Free

This is the Cambridge University museum of Geology.

University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology – Free

Self-Explanatory!

Whipple Museum – Free

The History of Science

County Folk Museum – Free

For the Folk lovers

Museum of Classical Archaeology – Free

Another Museum from the CU.

Scott Polar Museum – Free

History of the science in the Antarctic exploration

Museum of Zoology – Closed until 2016

Galleries

Kettles Yard – Free

One of the best art galleries in Cambridge

New Hall Art Collection – Free

Close to the Fitz Museum

Pubs and Clubs

There are many beautiful pubs and a few clubs in Cambridge if you fancy a bit of night life.

Fez Club

Probably the most popular club for students, normally £3 to £5 entry.

The Fountain

This is a day time pub and turns into a club at night, it’s one of the more popular places in Cambridge, and depending on what you like, this could be the best place for. I’d have to say it’s my favourite place to go when there is a decent night happening.

The King Street Run

My favourite pub, not for everyone, but has a great atmosphere!

The Regal This is the cheapest place in Cambridge to get a drink, always free entry and located on Regent street.

For more information on the best pubs and clubs in Cambridge have a look at the VisitCambridge website.

Punting

Most punting places charge from around £14.00 for adults and £7 for kids. Here are some of the most popular places to go punting in Cambridge.

The Cambridge Punting Company – guided punt tours along the backs of the historical Cambridge University. Cambridge Chauffeur Punts – See the famous bridges and colleges along the River Cam.

Let’s Go Punting – private and shared Chauffeured River Tours of Cambridge.

Scudamores Punting – College backs punting.

Botanic Gardens

The botanic gardens in Cambridge, opened in 1846 and hosts plants from all over the world inside 40-acres of gardens and glasshouses! It cost £4.50 for admission.

Historical walks

If you are interested in the history of Cambridge and its walks I would recommend this website, it has detailed maps and lots of information!